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fee (n.) The feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe “a forester by heritable right.” As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for “remuneration for service in office” (late 14c.), hence, “payment for (any kind of) work or services” (late 14c.). From late 14c. as “a sum paid for a privilege” (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as “money payment or charge exacted for a licence, etc.” source etymonline attorn (n.) late 13c., Anglo-French, “to turn over to another,” from Old French atorner “to turn, turn to, assign, attribute, dispose,” from a- “to” (see ad-) + tourner “to turn,” from Latin tornare “to turn on a lathe,” from tornus “lathe,” from Greek tornos “lathe, tool for drawing circles,” from PIE root *tere- (1) “to rub, turn.” In feudal law, “to transfer homage or allegiance to another lord.” source etymonline attorney (n.) early 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), “one appointed by another to act in his place,” from Old French atorné “(one) appointed,” past participle of aturner “to decree, assign, appoint,” from atorner “to assign,” literally “to turn to” (see attorn). The sense is of “one appointed to represent another’s interests.” source etymonline
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mortgage (n.) And it seemeth, that the cause why it is called mortgage is, for that it is doubtful whether the feoffor will pay at the day limited such sum or not: and if he doth not pay, then the land which is put in pledge upon condition for the payment of the money, is taken from him for ever, and so dead to him upon condition, &c. And if he doth pay the money, then the pledge is dead as to the tenant, &c. [Coke upon Littleton, 1664] Source etymonline
nationality (n.) 1690s, “separate existence as a nation, national unity and integrity,” from national + -ity (in some usages perhaps from French nationalité. As “fact of belonging to or being a citizen of a particular state,” from 1828, gradually shading into “race, ethnicity.” Meaning “a racial or ethnic group” is by 1832. Related: Nationalities. Source etymonline national (adj.) “of or pertaining to a nation or a country regarded as a whole; established and maintained by the nation; peculiar to the whole people of a country,” 1590s, from French national (16c., from Old French nacion), and also from nation + -al (1). Opposed to local or provincial (or in the U.S., state). source etymonline From c. 1600 as “introduction, establishment.” From 1580s as “a planting with people or settlers, a colonization;” used historically used for “a colony, an original settlement in a new land” by 1610s (the sense in Rhode Island’s Providence Plantations, which were so called by 1640s). plantation (n.) The meaning “large farm on which tobacco or cotton is grown” is recorded by 1706; “Century Dictionary” [1895] defines it in this sense as “A farm, estate, or tract of land, especially in a tropical or semi-tropical country, such as the southern parts of the United States, South America, the West Indies, Africa, India, Ceylon, etc., in which cotton, sugar-cane, tobacco, coffee, etc., are cultivated, usually by negroes, peons, or coolies.” source etymonline we own no rights to these videos or photos and information contain or reported may not be the expressed views of the sceptre of judah website, american moor news media. this information is reported as news, study, research and education for community improvement throughout the world te king

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