Mormons keepers of the moorish creed

Moor (n.)

“North African, Berber, one of the race dwelling in Barbary,” late 14c., from Old French More, from Medieval Latin Morus, from Latin Maurus “inhabitant of Mauretania” (Roman northwest Africa, a region now corresponding to northern Algeria and Morocco), from Greek Mauros, perhaps a native name, or else cognate with mauros “black” (but this adjective only appears in late Greek and may as well be from the people’s name as the reverse).

Also applied to the Arabic conquerors of Spain. Being a dark people in relation to Europeans, their name in the Middle Ages was a synonym for “Negro;” later (16c.-17c.); being the nearest Muslims to Western Europe, it was used indiscriminately of Muslims (Persians, Arabs, etc.) but especially those in India. Cognate with Dutch Moor, German Mohr, Danish Maurer, Spanish Moro, Italian Moro. Related: Mooress. Source etymonline

Mormon (n.) “adherent of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,” 1830, introduced by the religion’s founder, Joseph Smith (1805-1844), in Seneca County, N.Y., from Mormon, supposed prophet and author of “The Book of Mormon,” explained by Smith as meaning more mon, from English more + Egyptian mon “good.” As an adjective by 1842. Related: Mormonism. Source etymonline

latter-day (adj.) “belonging to recent times,” 1842; see latter (adj.). Originally in Latter-day Saints, the Mormon designation for themselves.

creed (n.) Old English creda “article or statement of Christian belief, confession of faith,” from Latin credo “I believe” (see credo). Broadening 17c. to mean “a statement of belief on any subject.” Meaning “what is believed, accepted doctrine” is from 1610s. Related: Creedal.

A Creed, or Rule of Faith, or Symbol, is a confession of faith for public use, or a form of words setting forth with authority certain articles of belief, which are regarded by the framers as necessary for salvation, or at least for the well-being of the Christian Church. [Philip Schaff, “The Creeds of Christendom,” 1877] Source etymonline

fram·er/ˈfrāmər/Learn to pronounce nou a person who shapes or creates a concept, plan, or system.”objections will be made if the framer of the law can be absolutely proved to have meant one thing”

the book of Mormon has prophecy being fulfilled today

about the “Mormon Codex”

Mormon book belongs to moorish people

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te king

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